White Star Line

Titanic memorials

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Browse a list of latest posts of Titanic memorials and connected locations in Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, Canada, and the United States of America.

  • 05 Jul

    In 1892 the "Review of Reviews", a journal part founded by William T Stead, carried a fictitious tale titled From the Old World to the New. The tale is the story of a clairvoyant - Stead was interested in spiritualism - aboard the White Star Line's Majestic who sensed a ship had collided with an iceberg. In the story, the character Mrs Irwin describes what she'd witnessed. "I saw a sailing ship among the icebergs. She had been stove[d] in by the ice, and was fast... Read more »

  • 14 Jun

    Standing on Bondgate Within in the Northumberland town of Alnwick is the White Swan Hotel. Behind its traditional stone facade is a hidden gem. The exterior of the hotel gives a clue; a small brass plaque states that "situated within this hotel is the first class lounge from the S.S. Olympic (1910-1936) twin ship to the legendary S.S. Titanic." The hotel not only contains much of the first-class lounge, but other fittings from the ship. The revolving door at the entrance to the hotel came from... Read more »

  • 15 Apr

    From 1859 the Harland and Wolff shipyard produced some 1,750 vessels during over a century of continuous shipbuilding.  It was the shipyard's contracts with the Oceanic Steam Navigation Company, better known as the White Star Line, that produced some seventy-five vessels for the shipping line.  The most famous ships amongst those vessels were the Olympic class liners Olympic, Titanic and Britannic. The Olympic class liners were built on two massive slipways at the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast.  Construction of the Olympic began first and,... Read more »

  • 14 Apr

    On 27 March 2012 a new public artwork was unveiled in front of the soon-to-be-opened Titanic Belfast building, constructed in a disused part of the Harland and Wolff shipyard on Queens Island in Belfast. The genesis of Titanic Belfast began with the identification of the need for a Titanic Signature Project, designed to support the growth and development of tourism in the city. Construction of the landmark building began in May 2009. Its form combines elements of a water crystal cluster, an iceberg, the White Star... Read more »

  • 10 Apr

    The Olympic class liners were built on two massive slipways, numbered 2 and 3, at the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. The slipways were built specifically to allow the construction of the new liners, but such was their size the new slipways occupied the space previously taken by three slipways at the yard. Built over a reinforced steel base, supported by piles driven deep into the ground, the slipways were spanned by a giant steel gantry built by the Glasgow firm of Sir William... Read more »

  • 29 Mar

    From the company's inception in 1869 the Oceanic Steam Navigation Company, better known as the White Star Line, owned and operated around one hundred vessels during its seven decades of commercial business. Alongside the famous transatlantic liners of the White Star Line fleet the company operated a number of smaller vessels. These were used at the White Star Line ports of call as tender vessels to carry passengers and their luggage from the dockside to the ship. The use of tenders saved time and was... Read more »

  • 15 Dec

    Amongst the Titanic memorials in her birthplace, the city of Belfast, are a growing number of recent public sculptures. Through the imagination and creativity of the sculptors the story of the Titanic, and her memory, is captured in unique public art installations. Standing in front of the Dr Pitt Memorial Park on the Newtownards Road in the east of the city is the 'Titanic Yardmen 401' sculpture. The sculpture remembers the men of the Harland and Wolff shipyard, especially those who built the Titanic. Over the... Read more »

  • 11 Nov

    Amongst the Titanic memorials in her birthplace, the city of Belfast, are a growing number of recent public sculptures. Through the imagination and creativity of the sculptors the story of the Titanic, and her memory, is captured in unique public art installations. One of the largest in Belfast is the 'Kit', located on the quayside of Abercorn Basin, now known as Belfast Harbour Marina since 2009. The 'Kit' cost £200,000 to produce, funded jointly by the Titanic Quarter and Arts and Business NI. The... Read more »

  • 15 May

    Originally number 12 Windsor Avenue, now numbered 20, "Dunallan" stands on Windsor Avenue off Lisburn Road in south Belfast, near to St Mary's University. For four years "Dunallan" was the Belfast home of Thomas Andrews, who as Managing Director of the Harland and Wolff shipyard led the design of the Titanic. Thomas Andrews was born on 7 February 1873 to Thomas and Eliza Andrews. By the age of sixteen Thomas Andrews was apprenticed at his uncle's shipyard in Belfast where he spent the next five years... Read more »

  • 15 Apr

    Designed by the Belfast architectural practice of Young & McKenzie and built by the Courtney & Company of Belfast between 2 October 1913 and 29 January 1915 the hall was officially opened by Thomas Andrews' widow, Helen. The hall was intended to serve as a community hall, but since the 1970s it has been part of the Andrews Memorial Hall. Inside the hall, on the first floor landing, reached by stairs from the hall's entrance hall, is an impressive bronze plaque dedicate to the memory... Read more »